The Disaster Center's Hurricane Alberto Page
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17. Year 2006 Hurricane Alberto Diary
June 15, 2006
Tropical Storm Alberto spins off tornadoes, high winds
Many shrug off evacuation ahead of Alberto Low numbers worry officials By Aaron Deslatte CAPITOL BUREAU
Damage From Tropical Storm Alberto 6/15/2006 By Heather Sorentrue/WCJB TV20 News Tropical Storm Alberto spared North Central Florida from any massive destruction. But, it sure doesn't feel that way to one family that lost its home and everything inside.
By BRUCE SMITH Associated Press June 14, 2006 -- Alberto weakens to a tropical depression over South Carolina...

At 500 AM EDT all tropical storm warnings have been discontinued.

Gale warnings are in effect from South Santee River South Carolina to Currituck Beach Light North Carolina.
At 500 am edt...0900z...the center of Tropical Depression Alberto was located near latitude 33.5 north...longitude 81.4 west or about 35 miles...60 km...south-southwest of Columbia South Carolina.
The depression is moving toward the northeast near 21 mph...34 km/hr. An increase in forward speed is expected over the next 24 hours.
Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph...55 km/hr...with higher gusts. Alberto is forecast to lose tropical characteristics later this morning...however some re-strengthening is possible during its transition to an extratropical cyclone.
Estimated minimum central pressure is 1003 Mb...29.62 inches. Storm total rainfall amounts of 2-4 inches with isolated maximum amounts to 6 inches are possible through this evening from central and eastern North Carolina into southeastern Virginia.
Coastal storm surge will subside today.

Isolated tornadoes are possible over north coastal South Carolina and southeastern North Carolina today.

IR

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Speed ProbabilityMariner's
1-2-3 Rule Wind Speed
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For the CDC index on hurricane information (including fact sheets in English and other languages), please see: 
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Hurricane-Related Documents and Resources Recently Released or Updated
Drive Safely
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/pdf/flyer-drive-safely.pdf
Returning Home After a Hurricane: Be Healthy and Safe
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/returnhome.asp
Cleaning and Sanitizing With Bleach after an Emergency
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/bleach.asp
Varicella Info from NIP
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/diseases/varicella/
Addition of Safe Water Tips to Announcer Read PSAs
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/psa_announcerreads.asp#rita
Disposal of Contaminated Medical Devices – FDA site
http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/emergency/disposal.html
Contact Information for Questions about Clinical Investigations Affected by Hurricane Katrina – FDA site
http://www.fda.gov/cder/emergency/clin_invest.htm  
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning After Hurricane Katrina --- Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi, August--September 2005 – MMWR Article
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm54e930a1.htm
 
The following documents have been recently UPDATED:
Effects of Hurricane Katrina on Children's Blood Lead Levels
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/katrina/leadkatrina.asp

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Damage Assessment and Post-Storm Impact Data

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Other sites

The Hurricane Watch Net
HurricaneTrack.com
Caribbean Hurricane Network
Hurricane Strike! Hurricane Science & Safety For Students
DURING A HURRICANE WATCH
(A Hurricane Watch is issued when there is a threat of hurricane conditions within 24-36 hours.)
1. Listen to a battery-operated radio or television for hurricane progress reports.
2. Check emergency supply kit.
3. Fuel car.
4. Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys, and garden tools and anchor objects that cannot be brought inside.
5. Secure buildings by closing and boarding up windows. Remove outside antennas.
6. Turn refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Open only when absolutely necessary and close quickly.
7. Store drinking water in clean bathtubs, jugs, bottles, and cooking utensils.
8. Store valuables and personal papers in a waterproof container on the highest level of your home. 9. Review evacuation plan.
10. Moor boat securely or move it to a designated safe place. Use rope or chain to secure boat to trailer. Use tiedowns to anchor trailer to the ground or house.
Source: floridadisaster.org/      Florida's Division of Emergency Management
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Tropical Storm Alberto formed as a tropical depression early in the morning on June 10, 2006.

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Rita@disastercenter.com
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  • Tropical Storm Alberto --  The graphics and links below will be updated  once Alberto reaches tropical depression status.

     

    Year 2006 Hurricane Alberto Diary
    June 13, 2006 -- Alberto moving faster toward the northeast

    Wind damage reported in the Savannah Georgia area... A tropical storm warning remains in effect from South Santee River South Carolina southward to north of Altamaha Sound Georgia. Gale warnings are also in effect for the remainder of the South Carolina coast northward through portions of the North Carolina coast.

    At 1100 PM EDT...0300z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 31.8 north...longitude 82.3 west or about 55 miles...90 km...southwest of Statesboro Georgia... Or about midway between Alma and Vidalia Georgia.

    Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 16 mph...26 km/hr. this general direction of motion...with a gradual increase in forward speed...is expected during the next 24 hours. on this track the center will continue to move over southeastern Georgia tonight and early Wednesday... and move across South Carolina low country during the day on Wednesday.
    June 13, 2006 -- Alberto moving across southeastern Georgia...

    At 8 PM EDT the tropical storm warning has been discontinued from Flagler Beach Florida northward to Altamaha Sound Georgia.

    A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the Atlantic Coast from south Santee River South Carolina southward to north of Altamaha Sound.

    Gale warnings are also in effect for the remainder of the South Carolina coast northward through portions of the North Carolina coast.

    At 800 pm edt...0000z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 31.3 north...longitude 82.8 west or about 25 miles...35 km...southwest of Alma Georgia.

    Alberto is moving a little faster toward the northeast near 14 mph...22 km/hr. This general direction of motion...with a gradual increase in forward speed...is expected during the next 24 hours. On this track the center will continue to move over southeastern Georgia tonight...and across southern South Carolina Wednesday morning.

    Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph...65 km/hr...with higher gusts...in a few squalls. Weakening is forecast...and Alberto will likely become a tropical depression tonight or early Wednesday.
    Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles...280 km to the northeast and southeast of the center over the Atlantic waters.
    Estimated minimum central pressure is 1001 Mb...29.56 inches.
    A storm surge of 2 to 3 feet above normal tide levels is possible along the Atlantic coast in the warned area.

    Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 6 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 8 inches...are possible into Wednesday evening over the southeastern half of Georgia...much of North and South Carolina except for the western parts of those states...and into extreme southeastern Virginia. Additional rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches are also possible over the northern and central Florida peninsula.

    Isolated tornadoes are possible over southeastern Georgia and coastal South Carolina tonight.

    June 13, 2006 -- Alberto moves into southern Georgia

    At 5 PM EDT the tropical storm warning for the Gulf Coast of Florida is discontinued. A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the Atlantic coast from Flagler Beach Florida northward to South Santee River South Carolina. Gale warnings are also in effect for the remainder of the South Carolina coast northward through portions of the North Carolina coast.

    At 500 PM EDT...2100z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 30.7 north...longitude 83.2 west or very near Valdosta Georgia.
    Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 10 mph...17 km/hr...and this general direction of motion...with some increase in forward speed...is expected during the next 24 hours. On this track the center will continue to move over Georgia this evening and tonight and move into South Carolina Wednesday morning.
    Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph...65 km/hr...with higher gusts...in a few squalls. Weakening is forecast...and Alberto will likely become a tropical depression tonight.
    Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles...280 km to the northeast and southeast of the center.
    Estimated minimum central pressure is 1000 Mb...29.53 inches.

    A storm surge of 2 to 3 feet above normal tide levels is possible along the Atlantic Coast in the warned area.

    Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 6 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 8 inches...are possible into Wednesday evening over the southeastern half of Georgia...much of North and South Carolina except for the western parts of those states...and into extreme southeastern Virginia. Additional rainfall amounts of 2 to 4 inches are also possible over the northern and central Florida Peninsula.

    Isolated tornadoes are possible over southeastern Georgia and coastal South Carolina tonight.

    June 13, 2006 -- Alberto inland over north Florida and weakening...

    A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the Gulf Coast of Florida from Bayport to Indian Pass.
    A tropical storm warning remains in effect along the Atlantic Coast from Flagler Beach Florida to south Santee River South Carolina.

    At 200 PM EDT...1800z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located inland near latitude 30.4 north...longitude 83.4 west or about 55 miles... 85 km...east of Tallahassee Florida.
    Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 10 mph...17 km/hr...and this general direction of motion with some increase in forward speed is expected today and tonight. On this track the center will be moving over Georgia later today.

    Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 40 mph ...65 km/hr...with higher gusts...in a few squalls. Continued weakening is expected as the system moves over land...and Alberto will probably become a tropical depression later today or this evening.
    Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 145 miles...230 km from the center...mainly over water.
    The estimated minimum central pressure is 998 Mb...29.44 inches.
    Coastal storm surge flooding should begin to subside along the northeast gulf coast.

    Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches...are possible through Wednesday morning over all of Georgia except for the northwest part of the state...over much of South Carolina except for the extreme western portion of the state....and into portions of southern North Carolina. Additional rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches are possible over central and northern portions of the Florida Peninsula and the eastern Florida Panhandle.

    Isolated tornadoes are possible over portions of northeastern Florida...southeastern Georgia...and coastal South Carolina today.

    June 13, 2006 -- At around 1230 PM EDT Alberto Makes Landfall...

    Reports from an Air Force Reserve unit Hurricane Hunter aircraft and national weather service doppler radar observations indicate that the center of Tropical Storm Alberto has made landfall in The Big Bend area of Florida near Adams Beach...about 50 miles southeast of Tallahassee Florida.

    June13, 2006 -- Alberto About To Make Landfall

    At 11 am EDT the hurricane warning is changed to a tropical storm warning for the gulf coast of Florida from Bayport northward and westward to the Ochlockonee River. All warnings south of Bayport are discontinued. A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the Gulf Coast of Florida from Bayport to Indian Pass. A tropical storm warning remains in effect along the Atlantic Coast from Flagler Beach Florida to South Santee River South Carolina.

    At 1100 am EDT...1500z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 29.8 north...longitude 83.8 west or about 50 miles... 80 km...southeast of Tallahassee Florida. This position is just offshore of Keaton Beach Florida.
    Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 9 mph...15 km/hr...and this general motion is expected to continue today. On this track the center will be moving over northern Florida and into southern Georgia later today and this evening.
    Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph...85 km/hr...with higher gusts. Weakening will occur as the center moves over land today. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 115 miles...185 km from the center...mainly over water.
    An Air Force Reserve unit Hurricane Hunter aircraft recently reported a minimum central pressure of 996 Mb...29.41 inches. Coastal storm surge flooding of 5 to 7 feet above normal tide levels can be expected mainly to the east and south of where the center makes landfall.

    Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches...are possible through Wednesday morning over all of Georgia except for the northwest part of the state...over much of South Carolina except for the extreme western portion of the state....and into portions of southern North Carolina. Additional rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches are possible over central and northern portions of the Florida Peninsula and the eastern Florida Panhandle.
    Isolated tornadoes are possible over portions of northeastern Florida...southeastern Georgia...and coastal South Carolina today.

    June 13,2006 Alberto nearing the northeast Gulf of Mexico Coast.

    A hurricane warning remains in effect for the gulf coast of Florida from Longboat Key to the Ochlockonee River.
    A tropical storm warning remains in effect south of Longboat Key to Englewood...and west of the Ochlockonee River to Indian Pass. A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the Atlantic coast from Flagler Beach Florida northward to south Santee River South Carolina.
    At 800 AM EDT...1200z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 29.5 north...longitude 84.2 west or about 50 miles... 80 km...east-southeast of Apalachicola Florida and about 75 miles...120 km...west-northwest of Cedar Key Florida. Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 9 mph...15 km/hr...and this general motion is expected to continue until landfall around midday today.
    Maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph...100 km/hr...with higher gusts. There is now only a slight possibility that Alberto will become a hurricane prior to landfall. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 175 miles...280 km from the center. The latest minimum central pressure reported by the air force reserve hurricane hunters was 995 Mb...29.38 inches. Coastal storm surge flooding of 7 to 9 feet above normal tide levels can be expected mainly to the east and south of where the center makes landfall. Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches...are possible over portions of Florida and southern Georgia through today. Storm total amounts of 3 to 5 inches are expected over South Carolina and the coastal plains of North Carolina and southeastern Virginia through Wednesday.
    Isolated tornadoes are possible over portions of central and northern Florida...southern Georgia...and southern South Carolina today.

    June 13, 2006 - With a slug of dry air overtaking the center of circulation... Alberto's chances of becoming a hurricane are evaporating. June 13, 2006 - Alberto Not Strengthening As It Approaches The Gulf Coast Of Florida.
    With a slug of dry air overtaking the center of circulation... Alberto's chances of becoming a hurricane are evaporating.

    A hurricane warning remains in effect for the Gulf Coast of florida from Longboat Key to the Ochlockonee River. Preparations to protect life and property should have already been completed.
    At 5 am EDT the tropical storm warning along the Atlantic Coast has been extended northward to South Santee River South Carolina. A tropical storm warning is now in effect for the Atlantic coast from Flagler Beach Florida northward to South Santee River.
    A tropical storm warning remains in effect south of Longboat Key to Englewood...and west of the Ochlockonee River to Indian Pass.
    Tropical storm center located near 29.2n 84.2w at 13/0900z position accurate within 30 nm

    June 12, 2006 Tropical Storm Alberto approaches the Florida coast

    June 12. 2006 Alberto Not Strengthening As It Approaches The Gulf Coast Of Florida. At 200 AM EDT...0600z...the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 28.8 north...longitude 84.4 west or about 85 miles...140 km...west-southwest of Cedar Key Florida. Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 10 mph...17 km/hr...and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours. The center of Alberto is expected to reach the Florida Gulf Coast within the warning area late this morning.

    June 12. 2006 Alberto Continues To Churn Toward The Florida Big Bend Area...
    A hurricane warning remains in effect for the Gulf Coast of Florida from Longboat Key to the Ochlockonee River.
    A tropical storm warning is in effect south of Longboat Key to Englewood and west of the Ochlockonee river to Indian Pass.
    A tropical storm warning is also in effect for the Atlantic Coast from Flagler Beach Florida northward to the Savannah River...at the Georgia/South Carolina border.
    Present movement toward the northeast or 40 degrees at 9 kt
    At 1100 PM EDT the center of Tropical Storm Alberto was located near latitude 28.4 north...longitude 84.6 west or about 95 miles...150 km...south-southeast of Apalachicola Florida and about 105 miles...165 km...west-southwest of Cedar Key Florida.
    Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph...110 km/hr...with higher gusts. While some fluctuations in strength are possible prior to landfall... Alberto still has the potential to become a hurricane before reaching the Florida Gulf Coast Tuesday morning. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 160 miles...260 km ...to the northeast and southeast of the center.
    Coastal storm surge flooding of 8 to 10 feet above normal tide levels can be expected over a large portion of the warning area. Tide levels in the warning areas are already running more than 2 feet above normal. Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches... Are possible through Tuesday across portions of central and northern Florida and southern and southeastern Georgia. Isolated tornadoes are possible over portions of central and northern Florida and southern Georgia tonight and Tuesday.
    June 12, 2006 At 4 PM EST The National Hurricane Center indicated that ...Alberto continues headed for the northeast gulf coast... A hurricane warning remains in effect for the gulf coast of Florida from longboat key to the Ochlockonee river.

    Tropical storm warning remains in effect south of longboat key to Englewood...and west of the Ochlockonee river to Indian Pass.
    Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph...110 km/hr...with higher gusts. Alberto could become a hurricane prior to landfall.
    Alberto is moving toward the northeast near 10 mph...
    Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph...110 km/hr...with higher gusts. Alberto could become a hurricane prior to landfall.
    Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 230 miles...370 km...to the northeast and southeast of the center.
    Coastal storm surge flooding of 8 to 10 feet above normal tide levels can be expected over a large portion of the warning area. It is...however...impossible to specify exactly which locations will experience the greatest storm surge flooding because this will depend upon the precise track and wind field near landfall.
    Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches...are possible through Tuesday across portions of central and northern Florida and southeastern Georgia...mainly along and to the right of the track of Alberto.
    Isolated tornadoes are possible over portions of central and northern Florida today and tonight. Estimated minimum central pressure is 997 mb...29.44 inches.
    June 12, 2006 The National Hurricane Center at 11 AM EDT upgraded its forecast for Alberto and is now issuing a hurricane warning for the Gulf Coast of Florida from Long Boat Key to the the Ochlockonee River.
    Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 230 miles...370 km...to the northeast and southeast of the center. The large extent of tropical storm force winds means that these winds will be felt along the coast well in advance of the arrival of the center. The hurricane hunters recently reported a minimum central pressure of 997 mb...29.44 inches. Coastal storm surge flooding of 8 to 10 feet above normal tide levels can be expected over a large portion of the warning area. Storm total rainfall amounts of 4 to 8 inches...with isolated maximum amounts to 10 inches...are possible through Tuesday across portions of central and northern Florida and southeastern Georgia...mainly along and to the right of the track of Alberto. Isolated tornadoes are possible over central Florida today and tonight.

    June 11, 2006 Tropical Depression One officially became Tropical Storm Alberto today at 10AM CDT. Four to eight inches of rainfall are forecast to fall over the Florida Keys through Monday. Alberto is expected to drop from 10 to 20 inches of rainfall over western Cuba this weekend, with isolated amounts of 30 inches over higher terrain.

    June 10, 2006 -- Tropical Depression One, now forming south of Cuba, is expected to be the first named storm of the year. It now appears that the major threat of Alberto is going to be due to the heavy rainfall associated with the storm. Rainfall amounts in excess of 10 inches and as much as 30 inches in some areas are likely to produce flash flooding and landslides. Alberto is expected to pass into the Gulf of Mexico between Cuba and the Yucatan Peninsula and then turn towards the northeast and impact the west central Florida Coast. The remnants of Alberto are then expected to make a run up the eastern seaboard.

    On Aug. 9th 2000 Hurricane Alberto crossed 50 degree east moving in a northwesterly direction. The current projected path is for the storm to pass to the east of the Bermuda Islands.
    The next named storm will be Beryl for the year 2000 hurricane season
    For current Year 2000 reports see The Disaster Center's Year 2000 Hurricane Message Board Page 

    The name Alberto was first used in 1982

    In 1982 Hurricane Alberto  was a named Storm from the 2nd - 6th  of June.  The Storms maximum winds: 75 Knots with a minimum pressure of: 985 Hurricane Alberto was a Category: 1 and did not strike the United States.

    In 1988 Tropical Storm Alberto was active from the 5th - 8th of August.  The Storms maximum winds: 35 Knots with a minimum pressure of: 1002.  Alberto formed off the coast of the Carolinas and traveled up the eastern coast line finally making land fall in Canada

    In 1994 Tropical Storm Alberto brought heavy rains and flooding to Georgia, Alabama and Florida.

    T.S. Alberto Remembered: Ten Year Anniversary by James Noel, Hydrologist WFO Preachtree City 7/1/04

    July 1994 Alberto Cat 1 Tropical Storm Alberto was an active system from the 30th of June to 7th of July.  The Storms maximum winds: 55 Knots with a minimum pressure of: 993.  Alberto caused the deaths of 30 lives due to flooding and $500,000,0000 worth of damage.

    Georgia by some accounts experienced its worst flooding in modern times. An estimated 1700 roads and 600 bridges were forced out of service, and several towns were largely under water. Over 40,000 people were evacuated due to the rising waters, and about 12,000 homes and businesses were destroyed or severely damaged by the flooding. Thirty people were killed in Georgia and 2 were killed in Alabama--many of these vehicle- related. Approximately 11,500 Georgians applied for federal disaster assistance, as 55 counties in Georgia were declared disaster areas. Also, 13 counties in Florida and 10 counties in Alabama were declared disaster areas. (See Figure 2 for a map of counties declared disaster areas.) $60 million in federal aid was approved for the flood-damaged areas.

    Flooding also affected some parts of the Florida panhandle and southeast Alabama. The flooding severely damaged or destroyed many homes, businesses, farms, highways, dams, and bridges, with damage estimates for the three affected states now placed at between $750 million and $1 billion. Damage to government-owned structures was estimated to be nearly $60 million. Agricultural damage estimates are placed at around $100 million, but may well be higher in the final analysis.

    NOAA --Tropical Storm Alberto  Heavy Rains and Flooding  Georgia, Alabama, Florida  July 1994

    Suspended sediment and agricultural chemicals in floodwaters caused by tropical storm Alberto 1994

    U.S. Geological Survey Yearbook Fiscal Year 1994
     

    Counties in the declared disaster area 1994
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