Hurricane Mitch Reports From The Disaster Center
Our most recent reports indicate:
Honduras: 5,657 persons were killed, 8,052 are missing, 11,762 were injured while approximately 1.9 million are affected.
Nicaragua: 2,863 people had died, 884 are missing, and 867,752 are affected
Guatemala: 258 deaths and 120 people missing.
El Salvador: 239 deaths and 135 people missing.
Costa Rica: 4 deaths; 4 people missing.

 


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For inquiries concerning U.S. citizens, call the U.S. Department of State, American Citizens Services for Hurricane Mitch at (202) 647-6614.

InterAction members accepting contributions
Organizations accepting In-Kind Donations for Honduras
USGS Disaster in Central America

Regional Reports

Internatational Response -- reports on this web page
United Nations Inter-Agency Transitional Appeal for Relief and Immediate Rehabilitation in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Belize Caribbean Disaster Emergency Response Agency (CDERA)
Delegación Regional - Ciudad de Guatemala
Caribbean Red Cross
The Caribbean Hurricane Page -- Caribbean Reports
OXFAM GB -- Huracán Mitch destruye  región -- Spanish
Oxfam GB --Emergency Response in Central America Following Hurricane Mitch.
USAID Hurricanes In Central America
Inter-American Development Bank Hurricane Mitch
C.A.R.E. Hurricane Mitch

Country Reports

Guatemala   HondurasNicaraguaCosta Rica   El Salvador  Belize

Florida Reports

Honduras From the Republic of Honduras Government SETCO Number of dead people:   5,273 Number of missing people: 11,085; Injured people 1,932,482; People in Shelters 427,138; Bridges Destroyed 33, Damaged 75

Republic of Honduras Government -- English
Gobierno de la República de Honduras -- Spanish
Comisión Permanente de Contingencias -- Spanish
Comission Permanente des Contingences COPECO -- Français
UN Hurricane Mitch Information Center . -- English
Secretaria De Relaciones Exteriores Republica De Honduras. -- Spanish
Honduras necesita tu ayuda-- Spanish
Honduras needs your help-- English
S.O.S. Honduras -- Spanish
"Mitch" En Honduras"Copeco" Informe Oficial -- Spanish
DIARIO TIEMPO -- Spanish
La Prensa de Honduras. -- Spanish
Honduras This Week
Hurricane Mitch -- HONDURAS.COM
LA TRIBUNA -- Spanish
Honduras.net Help -- English
From President Carlos Flore --Appeal to the international community
From: Edna Amador/General  Editor LA PRENSA, San Pedro Sula, Honduras
 From the Hotel Honduras Maya Nov. 2
 Honduras This Week - Urgent Message from the Editor

President Carlos Flore - Honduras
Appeal to the international community

"Honduras is mortally wounded, but not about to expire. We will get back on our feet...  May the Lord illuminate us and give us all strength.
We are making an urgent and anguished appeal to the international community, to all countries, to international financial organizations and to aid organizations so that they heed this SOS.
Our capacity for suffering and pain was never before put to such a hard test.''
 

From: Edna Amador/General  Editor LA PRENSA, San Pedro Sula, Honduras
 

TO ANY NEWSPAPER EDITOR AND CHARITY ORGANIZATION IN THE WORLD:

In the name of the Honduran people I thank you for your interest in helping
our country at this tragedy time.
We have been very busy editing our daily newspaper to inform and guide our
people at this difficult time, thats why we have not had time to prepare an
English edition about the real situation in Honduras.

However, we will work overnight if necessary to write a story to show the
world, through Internet, our needs. We hope tomorrow we can have it ready.

In the first hand I can tell you that Honduras lives it's most difficult
time in it's history. Hurricane Mitch stroke us with fury and have taken
away many hundreds of lives. Honduras President, Carlos Flores, said that
the victims can rise to thousands, because the storm left floods and slides
all over the country.

The North Coast territories, where comes the 70 percent of the country's
agricultural production, are destroyed. Large plantations of banana, coffee,
rice, fruits and cereals are gone. At the Central, Eastern, Western and
South sides of the country the situation is very similar. Kettle has drown
and people is starting to get hungry and food is scarce.

The country roads are broken, every major city is isolated because of most
of the brigdes felt under the furios water of rivers.

At this moment, there are almost a million of hondurans that lost their
homes. In Tegucigalpa, our capital city, entire neighborhood has dissapeared
and many are still in risk of falling down.

Our most urgent need are for food, medicines and clothes. At this moment
many of our brothers and sisters, many of them are small children,  have no
roof but are surviving on top of them, specially in the rural flooded areas.
This situation has been going on for the last six days and many of them are
still alilve expecting for the help to arrive.  Last information we have is
that many parents have tide their children to trees, to avoid them to fall
in the water and keep them alive.

As you see the tragedy is bigger than anyone can imagine. No honduran ever
expected this to happen and now we are in God hands.
 

THANK FOR ANYTHING YOU COULD DO TO HELP HONDURAS.

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Hotel Honduras Maya

the country is unravelling as the situation here gets from bad to
worse.  basic infrastructure is collasping, food supplies are running
dangerously low, gasoline is being rationed at this time, the relif
centers are out of food.  the american school and hotel honduras maya
are working relief kitchens with 25,000 meals a day output.  we have the
demand for much, much, more, but we are out of food for emergency
relief.  the city is cut off by land as all bridges and roads in and out
of the city are unpassable.  the relief flights and air bridge have only
or or two days of jet fuel left.  the entire country has been devastated
by this storm and after effects.  please send qualified help.  the
country should be divided into sections or regions and allow one group
or agency to set up relief, for example US Military and associated
agencies for bay islands, and north coast.  European union for San pedro
sula.  OEA for tegucigalpa, etc.....  pick your spot and run with the
ball.  please help

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Urgent Message from the Editor

Honduras This Week
At this time more than 1 million people are homeless by Hurricane Mitch. I don't know where to start but before phones and internet fail, let me relate you what happened in our country. Maybe at this moment only 20% of the telephone system is functioning. Potable water system is functioning in maybe 20% of the country. In a couple of days more things will only get worse because the govt. won't be able to control the water levels flowing through the dams and will be out of control. Electricity is working at 25 % of its capacity with no way to rebuild the infrasrtucture. More than 70,000 homes were destroyed. One million people are homeless, and all shelters, stadiums, and public facilities are full Probably at this moment at least 5000 peoples are in a treetops of for protection. Fifty big bridges are totally destroyed and maybe more than 200 small bridges are totally out. At this moment more than 100 people have died, but the figure will probably rise because it is difficult get up to date information. In other words I guess our country is bancrupt and 65 % of it's business production is damaged. People, government, and also international aid can feed the victims for the next 7 days. All bridges in Tegucigalpa are out. It can't get much worst than this. Please advise all a HTW suscribers that we are publishing this week's edition but the Post Office can't guarantee int'l delivery. Mario Gutierrez Jr. from HTW went from San Pedro Sula to the north coast with SERG KOVALENSKY from Washington Post, and since yesterday they have tried to return to Tegucigalpa by rounding the Yojoa Lake in Santa Barbara. Since 11.15 am of yesterday I havent any news. Please pass on all this information to the world, and incude this in our internet edition. Best regards, Mario Gutierrez Minera Editor
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Nicaragua

Efectos del Huracán Mitch en Nicaragua -- Spanish
Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores-- Spanish
Nicaragua Hoy
Nicaragua Devastated by Natural Disaster
Nicaragua La Tribuna -- Spanish
7Dias -- Spanish
La Prensa de Nicaragua. -- Spanish
Información sobre cómo ayudar a los damnificados del huracán Mitch -- Spanish
Fundación Movilización Social -- Nicaragua Devastated By Huricane Mitch -- English
Pagina Informativa UNAN-León, Nicaragua.

Nicaragua report
 

Nicaragua report
 

     Heavy rainfalls related to Hurricane Mitch and lasting more than one
     week, have caused inundations of large parts of Central and
     North-Western Nicaragua. Rivers destroyed several important bridges,
     the Panamerican Highway between Honduras/El Salvador and Nicaragua is
     interrupted at many places. About 200 people were reported beeing
     killed in the floods, in their collapsed houses or in minor mud
     flows.

     Traffic between Managua and the northern and northwestern
     departments, as Matagalpa, Esteli, Jinotega, Leon, Chinandega is
     interrupted. Many of the isolated places suffer shortages of food. At
     several places people had to seek salvation on their roofs or on
     trees as the water level increased very fast. Tens of thousands lost
     their homes.Dramatic rescue operations took place as for instance in
     Malacatoya where a group of people was saved by a ship,coming from
     Granada city. Malacatoya river had raised its level by more than 15
     m, the highways were overflooded and destroyed.

     At some places the landscape changed completely - rivers broadened
     their bed, or united themselves with other rivers, as occurred in the
     area of Sebaco. New lakes were formed and mountains were washed away,
     collapsed and disappeared. Crops were largely destroyed.

     Helicopter based rescue operations of the Nicaraguan Army were
     possible since yesterday when the meteorological conditions improved.

     Only today the dimension of a mud avalanche became clear which
     ocurred
     already on Friday afternoon at Casitas volcano. The mud covered an
     area of about 20 km length and 2-3 km width, southwest of the
     volcano. Numerous villages, settlements and houses between Casitas
     volcano and the town of Posoltega were destroyed.

     Exact informations about population density in this area do not exist
     but it is assumed that more than 1000 people, maybe even 2000,
     could have died. Today, Nicaraguan Army and Red Cross reported having
     found 400 cadavers. Rescue is very difficult because of the mud, and
     the rain continues.

     The Nicaraguan Government declared Natural Disaster Emergency for the
     most affected regions of the country. The main tasks for the next
     days are the rescue of people who are still in danger, helicopter
     transports of food to the isolated places and the preliminary
     reparation of the communication lines.
     Due to this extreme disaster the the Nicaraguan economy has certainly
     suffered a sensitive drawback. Thus, the reparation of highways is
     now of extraordinary importance as the coffee harvest should begin in
     a few days.

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Costa Rica

Tico Times -- English
La Nacion -- English
Comisión Nacional de Emergencia
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El Salvador

Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores -- spanish
El Portal Guanaco -- spanish
La Prensa El Salvador -- spanish
El Dario de Hoy El Salvador -- spanish
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Belize

Belize News Channel 5
San Pedro Sun
The Belize Times
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Guatemala


Prensa Libre
Siglo News
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Internatational Response

U.S.A.I. D  Fact Sheet #21 - Dec 4, 1998

PAHO Hurricane Mitch
USAID Central America - Hurricane Mitch Fact Sheet # 14
Urgence Pour L'amerique Centrale Apres Le Passage De L'ouragan "Mitch"

Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch El Salvador, Nicaragua And HondurasOcha Situation Report No. 12; 9 November 1998

Central America - Hurricane Mitch   Fact Sheet #7, 11/05/98 U.S. Agency For International Development
Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch Nicaragua, Guatemala And Honduras Ocha Situation Report No. 11
The White House Press Briefing Hurricane Mitch
President Clinton Orders Aid to Hurricane Mitch Victims in Central America
World Bank Press Release On Aid To Honduras
O.A.S. Calls Inter-American Agencies Together To Coordinate  Emergency Aid For Central America
Friend Ships responds to hurricane
Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch El Salvador, Guatemala And Nicaragua, Ocha Situation Report No. 10, 5 November 1998
U.S. SENDS DISASTER RELIEF TO CENTRAL AMERICA
President Clinton
Central America - Tropical Storm Mitch, Honduras, Nicaragua OCHA Situation Report No. 10

U.S. Agency For International Development
Bureau For Humanitarian Response
Office Of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance
Central America - Hurricane Mitch
Fact Sheet #21, 12/4/98
Background:
On October 24 Atlantic Tropical Storm Mitch was upgraded to a hurricane that developed into one of the strongest and most damaging storms to ever hit the Caribbean and Central America. At its height on October 26 and 27, the hurricane had sustained winds of 180 mph and dumped heavy rains over Central America. Although the winds diminished as Hurricane Mitch traveled inland over Honduras on October 30, the storm continued to produce torrential rains, reaching a rate of more than 4 inches per hour, which caused catastrophic floods and landslides throughout the region. After its slow, destructive march north and west across Honduras and Guatemala, Mitch dissipated over southeastern Mexico but briefly regained tropical storm strength as it moved northeasterly across Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, the Gulf of Mexico and southern Florida. By November 5 all tropical storm warnings were discontinued as Mitch's remnants tracked out into the Atlantic. Prior to Mitch making landfall, USAID/OFDA pre-positioned assets throughout the region along the storm's forecasted course, and quickly launched its emergency relief efforts as the hurricane passed overland. The USAID/OFDA Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) was established to coordinate the U.S. Government relief effort for Central America. Senior Regional Advisor and DART leader Paul Bell has managed the DART personnel and its operations in Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua from the USAID/OFDA Regional Office at the U.S. Embassy in San Jose, Costa Rica.
 

USG Assistance:
On November 5, President Clinton announced a $70 million U.S. Government (USG) assistance package for Central America in response to Hurricane Mitch. This package has been augmented and now totals $263 million, to be channeled largely through USAID, the Department of Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Of this package, $30 million in assistance will be provided by USAID=s Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), $35 million by USAID/Food for Peace (USAID/FFP), $130 million by DOD, $63 million by USDA, and the remaining $5 million will be for development assistance and micro-enterprise credits. The assistance by USAID will provide immediate disaster relief, including health and water/sanitation needs, food, shelter, and other emergency relief commodities as well as airlift support and logistics. USAID/OFDA assistance to date, described below, is part of this overall package, which is being closely coordinated with DOD.
 

Honduras:
Storm Impacts: Honduras suffered the brunt of Hurricane Mitch. After being stalled for more than two days off the country's northern coast, the storm traveled inland during October 30 and 31. Extensive wind damage and devastating floods occurred nationwide, but particularly on the northern seaboard and in the Bay Islands. As of December 1, the National Emergency Committee of Honduras (CONEH) reported that 5,657 persons were killed, 8,052 were missing, 11,762 were injured while approximately 1.9 million were affected. The U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) estimated at least 70,000 houses had been damaged and the USAID/OFDA DART estimated that more than 92 bridges had been damaged or destroyed. Damage to the nation's infrastructure isolated entire communities which made access by emergency aid workers extremely difficult and it hampered efforts to supply the larger cities with food, water and other essentials.
Immediate USG response: On October 27, the U.S. Ambassador to Honduras James F. Creagan declared a disaster due to the effects of Hurricane Mitch. USAID/OFDA responded immediately by providing a total of $125,000 to the USAID Mission in Honduras for the local purchase and transport of critical relief supplies, including food, simple cooking stoves, blankets, and medical supplies. USAID/OFDA also provided a total of $750,000 for the deployment of DOD aircraft to assist in aerial assessments, search and rescue operations, and delivery of relief supplies. Initially grounded by poor visibility, the USAID/OFDA-funded aircraft missions have been operating since November 1. As of December 3, 9 Black Hawk (UH-60 or MH-60) and 6 Chinook (CH-47) helicopters, and 2 C-27 and 1 C-12 cargo planes were distributing relief supplies from Soto Cano air base. By December 3, the DOD aircraft had flown 293 helicopter missions and 238 cargo plane airlifts. These flights carried 2,264,000 pounds of food, 117,900 gallons of water and 862,900 pounds of medicine, supplies and equipment. The flights also transported 4,132 people to medical centers. USAID/OFDA has deployed a total of 1,038 rolls of plastic sheeting, 32 10,000-liter water bladders, 25,500 five-gallon water jugs, and 1,004 body bags to Honduras at a total estimated cost of $523,999 including transport. The first airlift carrying USAID/OFDA relief supplies arrived at La Ceiba on October 31, the second arrived at Soto Cano airbase on November 1, the third airlift arrived at Soto Cano on November 2, the fourth arrived at Soto Cano on November 9, and the fifth arrived at Tegucigalpa on November 22. Supplemental relief commodities were transported by DOD on November 9 and 10.
To date, USAID/OFDA has provided $400,000 to the USAID Mission for the local purchase of food and emergency supplies, and for other response activities. Additionally, USAID/OFDA provided $800,000 to the USAID Mission, which granted funding to resident Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs) in Honduras for the purchase and delivery of local relief supplies. USAID/OFDA has also purchased and airlifted plastic food storage bags from Costa Rica that will allow for the distribution of critical food stocks to 100,000 families in Honduras. USAID/OFDA provided $2 million to USAID in Tegucigalpa to fund projects to repair the nation's water supply system. On November 20, USAID/OFDA provided $2,133,000 through USAID in Tegucigalpa to CARE. This grant is to assist approximately 70,000 families for up to four months with basic livelihood needs such as: sanitation and health, agriculture, construction, food and shelter. On November 25, USAID/OFDA provided an additional $3,164,000 to USAID in Tegucigalpa to support grants with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for disaster response projects that will provide assistance in the following sectors: water/sanitation, emergency shelter, housing, roads and bridges, medicine, food, hygiene, and agriculture.
USAID/OFDA had disaster specialists on the ground in Honduras since October 27. A total of fifteen DART members from USAID, Miami-Dade County Fire Rescue Department (Miami-Dade), and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) operated out of Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, La Ceiba, Danli, Choluteca and Soto Cano airbase. USAID/OFDA DART personnel in Honduras assisted CONEH's Emergency Operations Center, conducted field assessments, coordinated aircraft and transport logistics, and performed other disaster relief activities.
Assessment Reporting and Recovery: USAID/OFDA DART reports that people are beginning to move out of shelters and return home. The staple crops did not sustain as much damage as the cash crops because the former are grown on higher ground. Because staple crops were relatively undamaged, there is an ample supply of local food on the market. In terms of infrastructure, the water systems and the roads networks are in need of repair. Hurricane Mitch devastated the Honduran road network and in the early days of the response, air transport was the only means to transport emergency relief supplies, including food and non-food items. The USG used the air assets of DOD for emergency rescue and to provide access to areas and people that were isolated. Now, however, the response has entered into the next phase. Over 90 percent of the bridges that were damaged by Mitch are now passable with provisional repairs or by-passes. Road access has improved dramatically, and all areas to which DOD had been flying relief supplies over the past weeks (La Ceiba, the Bay Islands, Trujillo, Olanchito, Isletas, Yoro, Danli, Catacamas, Choluteca, Mocoron, etc.) are now open by surface transportation. In addition to improved road access, all Honduran ports are now functional at some level and are also accessible by road. At last report, the port at Mocoron was cut off by road from Tegucigalpa but was accessible from Puerto Lempira.
USAID in Tegucigalpa and the USAID/OFDA DART continue to be in contact with the Government of Honduras concerning areas that might still require emergency assistance. However, as a result of the dramatically improved capabilities of ground transport, the projected need for DOD air support is diminishing. Limited needs may surface for air support to distribute commodities from local hubs to inaccessible rural areas. As the region has not fully entered its dry season, severe rains could again close some roads temporarily. The Honduran Government and USAID are in the process of building up stocks of critical supplies in vulnerable areas. Additionally, USAID and the DART continue to monitor the progress of road rehabilitation and other recnstruction and rehabilitation efforts.
 

Nicaragua:
Storm Impacts: Mitch inflicted its greatest damage in Nicaragua through severe rains that caused extensive flooding and landslides. As of November 19, the Nicaraguan National Emergency Commission estimated that 2,863 people had died, 884 were missing, and 867,752 were affected as a result of the disaster, many after a large mudslide inundated ten communities situated at the base of the Casitas Volcano. A Nicaraguan transportation official reported as of November 6 that 71 bridges are either destroyed or heavily damaged, and OCHA estimated that 70% of roads were impassable immediately after the storm. On November 19, the Government of Nicaragua estimated that 31,750 houses were destroyed and 113,950 were damaged. Further the National Emergency Commission estimates that total losses were $400 million in housing, $605 million in the transportation network, $185 million in other infrastructure and $170 million in agriculture.
Immediate USG response: On October 29, U.S. Ambassador to Nicaragua Lino Gutierrez declared a disaster due to continued flooding. USAID/OFDA has provided $175,000 for the local purchase and transport of critical relief supplies, including medicines, food and shelter material. On November 2, USAID/OFDA provided $250,000 for the deployment of DOD UH-60 and CH-47 helicopters to assist with search and rescue efforts and the delivery of relief supplies. As of December 3, 4 UH-60 and 2 CH-47 helicopters were operating in Nicaragua. By December 3, 128 helicopter missions have transported 755,000 pounds of food and 68,200 pounds of medicine, supplies and equipment within Nicaragua.
Airlifts of USAID/OFDA relief supplies to Nicaragua, consisted of 679 rolls of plastic sheeting, 10,000 polyester blankets, 4,000 wool blankets, three 10,000-gallon water bladders, and 15,500 five-gallon water jugs, at a total estimated cost of $419,267 including transport. The first airlift arrived in Managua on November 4, a second on November 8, and a third on November 19. On November 19, USAID/OFDA provided $4 million to USAID/Managua to fund relief grants to reduce hunger and the threat of disease for thousands of victims in rural areas.
USAID/OFDA has operated in Nicaragua since October 29. A total of eleven DART personnel from USAID, Miami-Dade, and DOD have conducted assessments, assisted national search and rescue operations, and performed other response activities throughout the country.
Assessment Reporting and Recovery: All major roads in Nicaragua are open, with a few exceptions. Although most roads are passable, there are some detours and temporary measures to allow access. The delivery of emergency supplies by DOD helicopter continues, but as roads open more and more relief commodities are moved overland. Since November 3, DOD has carried more than 500,000 pounds of supplies on more than 135 flights to 66 affected communities in Nicaragua.
On November 30, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) reported epidemic levels for cholera, leptospirosis and dengue. Local health teams have conducted extraordinary prevention and outbreak control efforts.
 

Guatemala:
Storm Impacts: The storm moved northwestward across Guatemala on November 1, causing heavy rains and severe flooding. The national emergency office (CONRED) took steps to evacuate 5,969 people prior to the storm's arrival. The Red Cross estimated that 27,000 people were still housed in shelters as of November 4. As of November 9, officials reported a total of 258 deaths and 120 people missing in Guatemala. The most recent reporting from OCHA indicated that 32 bridges, and 40 roads had been severely damaged or destroyed by flood waters and CONRED reported that about 19,000 homes were either destroyed or heavily damaged. On November 5 the U.S. Embassy estimated that 95% of the nation's banana crop was damaged, 25-60% of the corn, bean, coffee, and sugar crops were destroyed, and 30% of the cattle herd was lost.
Immediate USG response: On October 31, Ambassador Donald J. Planty declared a disaster for Guatemala. In response, USAID/OFDA provided $25,000 through the U.S. Embassy to Catholic Relief Services for the local purchase of food. USAID/OFDA has delivered 290 rolls of plastic sheeting, 3,000 polyester blankets, 7,350 five-gallon water jugs, and four 3,000-gallon water bladders to Guatemala, at a total estimated cost of $182,013 including transport. The first airlift arrived in Guatemala City on November 4, and the second on November 9. USAID/OFDA has also provided $ 50,000 for the rental of local helicopters for aerial assessments of disaster-affected areas. As of December 3, 6 UH-60 and 4 CH-47 helicopters were operating in Guatemala to facilitate USAID/OFDA relief efforts. On November 18 USAID/OFDA provided $1 million in funding to USAID/Guatemala to support grants with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) for disaster response projects that will provide assistance in the following sectors: water/sanitation, emergency shelter, medicine, hygiene, and agriculture.
USAID/OFDA disaster relief personnel have operated in Guatemala since October 27. They have assisted CONRED in coordinating the national relief effort, and have conducted damage assessments and oversight of USAID/OFDA assistance. A total of five USAID/OFDA DART members have operated in Guatemala, and as of November 24 there are three remaining.
Assessment Reporting and Recovery: The DART reports indicate that northeastern Guatemala was most severely affected, including Isabal, Zacapa and Alta Verapaz. On November 12 the DART reported that in Panzos, Alto Verapaz, there are 10,000-12,000 displaced persons from 30 communities that suffered from flooding, landslides, and swollen rivers. Dead animals have infected the water supply, and most aqueducts have been destroyed. The lack of potable water has resulted in the first cases of diarrhea, amoebas, and undernourishment. Some communities are still totally isolated, and many houses have extensive roof damage. Sand flows in the water have affected rice, maize, bean, and coffee crops. It is estimated that it will be six months before replanting can take place. Community leaders indicate an urgent need for salt, sugar, soap, vegetable oil, chlorine tablets, water jugs, and plastic sheeting. The DART also reported that in Izabal there are 18,350 people in shelters, mainly from banana plantation communities, who are expect to remain displaced for the next 60-90 days. The DART also reports that all major roads are passable and the bridges damaged along the Atlantic Coast Highway are operable.
The DART recommends that the international donor community continue to focus on the following relief and recovery priorities during the next 60 days: food and water distribution to displaced persons continue for the next 60 days; environmental sanitation, including distribution of tools; massive campaign for disease prevention and control; reconstruction of water supply systems; provision of agricultural inputs and tools; and provision of building materials and tools for home reconstruction.
 

El Salvador:
Storm Impacts: As of November 9, the National Emergency Committee (NEC) of El Salvador reported that 239 deaths and 135 people missing as a result of flash floods, and the Red Cross estimated that 400 people had died and 600 were missing. As of November 6, the Government of El Salvador estimated that 55,864 people had been displaced and had established 107 emergency shelters. The government also estimates that 10,000 houses have been destroyed and thousands more were seriously damaged.
Immediate USG response: Ambassador Anne W. Patterson declared a disaster in El Salvador on November 1. In response, USAID/OFDA provided $25,000 for the immediate needs of flood victims. In addition, on November 5 USAID/OFDA airlifted 117 rolls of plastic sheeting, 5,150 polyester blankets, 6,000 five-gallon water jugs, and four 3,000-gallon water bladders, at a total estimated cost of $98,451 including transport. On November 18 USAID/OFDA provided $1 million to USAID/San Salvador to support grants with NGOs for disaster response projects that will distribute recovery packages to the areas of greatest need. As of December 3, 8 CH-47 and 4 UH-60 helicopters were operating in El Salvador to facilitate USAID/OFDA relief efforts.
A total of four USAID/OFDA DART members have been based in San Salvador to assist in the ongoing assessment of relief needs and priorities, and as of November 24 one member was still in the country.
Assessment Reporting and Recovery: The USAID/OFDA DART conducted a complete assessment of the southeastern portion of El Salvador from November 13-19. The most adversely affected communities were in Usulatan and San Miguel departments. The DART reported that only 1,000-2,000 homes were destroyed, which is fewer than previously reported by official sources. Most of the displaced population has returned home and only a few hundred people remain in emergency shelters. Many inhabitants of the Usulatan and San Miguel departments raise livestock and fish and no significant losses were sustained to any of the areas. Assessment reports indicate that only three major roads in El Salvador are still in need of major repair, while all seaports and airports are operational. The lack of potable water and sanitation are major concerns. Many people are drinking contaminated water because well covers were not an established practice. The Ministry of Health and PAHO have done an outstanding job preparing for, and responding to, the health needs of the affected population.
 

Belize:
Storm Impacts: The Government of Belize established an Emergency Operations Center in Belize City to prepare for the storm's arrival and evacuated over 75,000 people from Belize City and the coastal islands to temporary shelters in Belmopan. Contrary to initial forecasts, the hurricane did not directly strike Belize. Nonetheless, heavy rains caused flooding throughout the coastal areas, particularly in Belize City. The Government of Belize has since granted permission for residents to return to Belize City, however according to the Red Cross thousands had opted to remain in emergency shelters long afterward.
Immediate USG response: On October 29, U.S. Charge d'Affaires Joel Danies declared a disaster for Belize due to the impacts of Hurricane Mitch. In response, USAID/OFDA immediately provided $25,000 for the local purchase of food for distribution to displaced populations inhabiting emergency shelters. In addition, USAID/OFDA provided funding for two DOD Black Hawk helicopters based in Honduras to conduct overflight assessments and evacuations. Weather conditions during the storm's peak never permitted these aircraft to fly and as Hurricane Mitch turned and tracked away from Belize the helicopters were deployed to support emergency logistics requirements in Nicaragua. A four-person USAID/OFDA assessment team (comprised of a USAID/OFDA/LAC Regional Advisor and three Miami-Dade disaster specialists) was in Belize from October 29 to October 31. The team assessed needs of the evacuated population and reported that food stocks were adequate in Belmopan, but in short supply at Belize City. The team also reported that sanitation and hygiene were poor in all flood-affected areas. No additional USAID/OFDA assistance is anticipated for Belize.
 

Costa Rica:
Storm Impacts: Heavy rains along the entire Pacific coast of Costa Rica prompted the National Emergency Commission to evacuate at-risk populations. The Government of Costa Rica (GOCR) has since granted permission for people to return to their homes although approximately 1,700 people remained in temporary shelters up to a week after the storm had passed. Four people are reported dead as a result of the storm while four are still missing.
Immediate USG response: On October 23, the U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Costa Rica Richard L. Baltimore III declared a disaster due to severe flooding caused by Hurricane Mitch. USAID/OFDA responded by providing a total of $45,000 to the U.S. Embassy in San Jose. Funds were used to rent local helicopters to provide overflight assessments and the delivery of food, water, and medicine to affected populations. No additional USAID/OFDA assistance is anticipated for Costa Rica.
Region: USAID/OFDA has provided $5 million to DOD for reconstruction activities in Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala. These funds will support the purchase of reconstruction and engineering materials and supplies, including gravel for road repair. USAID/OFDA has provided an additional $4 million to DOD for continued aircraft support in Honduras, Nicaragua, Guatemala and El Salvador, which contributes to the positioning of more than 40 DOD helicopters in Central America. As of November 12, these aircraft had flown over 400 missions in support of USAID/OFDA relief efforts. To date, USAID/OFDA has provided $2 million to the PAHO to address emergency water and sanitation needs of Hurricane Mitch victims. USAID/OFDA has also provided $160,000 to the U.S. Embassy in San Jose for the regional deployment of emergency supplies and personnel. On December 2, USAID/OFDA provided a $500,000 grant to the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) for agricultural rehabilitation projects in Honduras and Nicaragua. The USAID/OFDA DART personnel stationed at the DART Headquarters in San Jose continue to coordinate the disaster response in the region.
 
 

Ref: OCHAGVA - 98/0345

Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch El Salvador, Nicaragua And HondurasOcha Situation Report No. 12; 9 November 1998

General

1. The deployment of international specialised staff and some 30 helicopters has brought Central
American governments' rescue, relief and assessment efforts into hitherto inaccessible areas of their
affected provinces: OCHA/UNDAC teams are assisting national emergency services in Honduras,
Nicaragua, Guatemala and El Salvador. USAID/OFDA Disaster Response Teams (DART) are in
Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. A French contingent of
over 200 engineers and disaster experts with equipment has arrived in Nicaragua. Dutch and
British naval ships, including Britain's newest helicopter carrier, have brought hundreds of marines
and equipment for rescue operations and distribution of supplies. Major voluntary organisations
such as MSF-France and OXFAM have made available medical supplies and teams to work with
national staff on appropriate responses in the health and food sectors.

2. Parallel to the ongoing intensive efforts to meet the immediate needs of victims, the groundwork
for the enormous reconstruction and rehabilitation tasks are jointly laid by Central American
governments, United Nations agencies and financial institutions. Both the World Bank and the Inter
-American Development Bank (IDB) have indicated that loans will be re-directed towards
necessities following the hurricane tragedy (see also OCHA sitrep. No. 10). UNDP and ECLAC
have agreed to undertake a comprehensive regional evaluation of the economic impact of Mitch as
a basis for a coordinated rehabilitation programme. UNDP is setting up a sub-regional Trust Fund
to support reconstruction work. OCHA-ERC de Mello and UNDP Administrator Speth will
convene an inter-agency task force to ensure linkages between emergency response and
rehabilitation activities. OCHA - ERC beginning a tour of affected countries.

3. At the request of the Secretary General of the United Nations, the Emergency Relief
Coordinator undertaking mission to El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua and Guatemala. The
purpose of the mission is to express solidarity of the UN System with the countries concerned, to
try and attract greater international interest in the emergency and rehabilitation needs, to evaluate
the UN response and to help determine what additional measures the UN could take to assist the
countries concerned. The ERC due to leave today El Salvador for Honduras.

El Salvador
Statistics: 58, 800 affected, 239 dead/235 missing ( UNDAC/WFP).

4. UNDAC team working with UNICEF, UNEP and USAID staff in assessment missions by air
and road. Total number of temporary shelter: 107.

5. Agricultural losses for staples such as beans, rice and maize between 16 and 50 percent. Cash
crop losses for cotton alone: 3,000 hectares.

6. Ministry Health reports 1,200 cases of respiratory ailments and 320 cases of gastro-intestinal
problems.

7. National response: results from damage assessment of all actors in the field consolidated with
NEC in Capital. 4 million USD released for reconstruction of private homes. Emergency phase
expected to last another four weeks. National food stocks considered sufficient to cover needs of
victims for several months. First reports on rehabilitation requirements expected toward end
November.

Nicaragua

Statistics: 800,000 affected population, 228 injured, 1848 dead/ 1287 missing (UNDAC/WFP).

8. Civil Defense (CD), as central coordinating body, and NEC continuing region by region
assessments of damages. CD also coordinating national and international response with the Office
of the United Nations Coordinator, supported by the UNDAC team.

The OCHA flight from Pisa Warehouse with 13.5 tons of goods donated by Governments of Italy
and Norway landed in Managua on 7 November.

9. There is still an urgent need for: food, clothing, medicines and shelter.

Honduras

Statistics: 1,932,500 affected. 6,420 dead/11,085 missing (UNDAC/WFP).

10. Under the authority of the UN Resident Coordinator, the UNDAC team has established
information centre at UN office in Capital. Members have travelled by air to southern parts of
Choluteca and Valle and report town of Choluteca as well as communities bordering river of same
name severely damaged. Currently team is focusing on San Pedro Sula and la Ceiba where OCHA
flight from OCHA warehouse Pisa landed with 13.5 tones of relief supplies. UNDAC member
reports situation in La Ceiba normal. Most affected provinces are Atlantida and Yoro. Distribution
of relief only possible by helicopter.

11. UNDAC also in contact with Dutch naval vessel 'Willem van der Saan' in S.Pedro de Sula.
Dutch helicopter survey took place over region including thermal power plant del Lago. No
specific damage reported and further rescue operations not envisaged in the immediate future.
Since flood water level below 1 meter, use of small boats, on board Dutch naval vessel, not
feasible.

Needs: Bailey bridges, food, water and medicines.

12. Inspection of temporary shelters in north by UNDAC members showed slow arrival of food
and precarious sanitary conditions. A Canadian group has started construction of multi-family
shelters with plastic materials.

13. OCHA is prepared to serve as a channel for cash contributions for the immediate relief needs
detailed above. Funds channelled through OCHA will be spent in coordination with the relevant
organizations of the UN system and OCHA will provide written confirmation of their use. Funds
should be transferred to OCHA account No. CO-590.160.1 at the UBS AG, PO Box 2770,
CH-1211 Geneva 2, with reference: OCHA - Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch.
 

Central America - Hurricane Mitch   Fact Sheet #7, 11/05/98
U.S. Agency For International Development  Bureau For Humanitarian Response (Bhr)
 Office Of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (Ofda)
 

   Background: Nearly two weeks ago Tropical Storm Mitch was upgraded to a hurricane
   that quickly developed into one of the strongest hurricanes to ever hit the Caribbean and
   Central America. At its height on October 26 and 27, the hurricane had sustained winds of
   180 mph and dumped heavy rains throughout Central America. Although the winds
   diminished as Mitch traveled inland over Honduras on October 30, the storm continued to
   produce torrential rains which caused catastrophic floods and landslides throughout the
   region. Mitch dissipated over southeastern Mexico after its slow march north and west
   across Honduras and Guatemala, but regained tropical storm strength today as it moved
   northward across Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula and the Gulf of Mexico. Tropical Storm
   Mitch has passed over southern Florida and storm warnings remain in effect for southern
   Florida, western Cuba and the northern islands of the Bahamas. Storm remnants linger over
   portions of Guatemala and Mexico, while skies have cleared elsewhere in Central America.
   Based on forecasted path of Hurricane Mitch, USAID/OFDA pre-positioned assets
   throughout the region and quickly redeployed its staff, equipment and funds with the storm's
   change in course. The USAID/OFDA Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) is
   coordinating the U.S. Government relief effort for Central America. Senior Regional Advisor
   and DART leader Paul Bell has managed the DART personnel and its operations in Belize,
   Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua from his base at the U.S.
   Embassy in San Jose, Costa Rica.

   Honduras: Honduras suffered the brunt of Hurricane Mitch. After being stalled for more
   than 48 hours off the country's northern coast, the storm traveled inland over October 30
   and 31. Extensive flooding and wind damage has been reported on the northern coast and in
   the Bay Islands. The National Emergency Commission (COPECO) reports that over 5,000
   people have died and 5,000 more are missing as a result of the storm. According to
   COPECO the storm has affected 1.5 million people and has left several hundred thousand in
   emergency shelters. The U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)
   reports that at least 70,000 houses have been damaged and 86 bridges have been
   destroyed. Damage to the nation's infrastructure has isolated entire communities making
   access by emergency aid workers extremely difficult and it has hampered efforts to supply
   the larger cities with food, water and other essential supplies.

   On October 27, the U.S. Ambassador to Honduras James F. Creagan declared a disaster
   due to the effects of Hurricane Mitch. USAID/OFDA responded immediately by providing
   a total of $125,000 to the USAID Mission in Honduras for the local purchase and transport
   of critical relief supplies, including food, simple cooking stoves, blankets, and medical
   supplies. USAID/OFDA also provided a total of $750,000 for the deployment of U.S.
   Department of Defense (DOD) aircraft to assist in overflight assessments, search and rescue
   operations, and delivery of relief supplies. Initially grounded by poor visibility, the
   USAID/OFDA-funded aircraft missions have been operating since November 1.
   USAID/OFDA has deployed a total of 460 rolls of plastic sheeting, twenty 10,000-liter
   water bladders, and 10,000 five-gallon water jugs to Honduras at a total estimated cost of
   $251,650 including transport. The first airlift carrying USAID/OFDA relief supplies arrived
   at La Ceiba on October 31 and the second arrived at Soto Cano airbase on November 1.
   A third airlift delivered the remainder of USAID/OFDA relief supplies to Soto Cano on
   November 2. To date, USAID/OFDA provided $400,000 to the USAID Mission for the
   local purchase of food and emergency supplies, and for other response activities.
   USAID/OFDA has provided $800,000 to the USAID Mission, which will grant funding to
   resident PVOs in Honduras for the purchase and delivery of local relief supplies.
   USAID/OFDA has also purchased and airlifted plastic food storage bags from Costa Rica
   that will allow for the distribution of critical food stocks to 100,000 families in Honduras.

   Seven USAID/OFDA disaster specialists have been deployed to Honduras to assist in the
   response to this disaster. A USAID/OFDA/LAC Regional Advisor and consultant arrived in
   San Pedro Sula on October 27 to assist COPECO's Emergency Operations Center with
   assessment and response activities. A USAID/OFDA Information Specialist and a
   Miami-Dade disaster specialist arrived in La Ceiba on October 31 to assist with assessment
   efforts and reporting requirements. Two additional Miami-Dade personnel arrived in
   Tegucigalpa on November 1 and have traveled on to La Ceiba. A USAID/OFDA disaster
   specialist has been deployed to Soto Cano and will coordinate the U.S. DOD aircraft
   logistics.

   Nicaragua: Mitch inflicted its greatest damage in Nicaragua through severe rains that
   caused extensive flooding and mudslides. Reports from Nicaragua indicate 6,420 people
   have died and 5,887 are missing, many as a result of a large mudslide in ten communities
   situated at the base of the Casitas Volcano. The U.S. Embassy in Managua reports that
   414,648 are affected and 415,000 people are displaced nationwide. OCHA reports
   damage to 40 bridges nationwide and estimated that 70% of roads are impassable.

   On October 29, U.S. Ambassador to Nicaragua Lino Gutierrez declared a disaster due to
   continued flooding. USAID/OFDA has responded by providing $75,000 do date for the
   local purchase of critical relief supplies, including medicines and food. USAID/OFDA
   deployed a Regional Advisor to Nicaragua on October 31 to assist with assessment and
   response activities. Two USAID/OFDA-funded Miami-Dade disaster specialists arrived in
   Nicaragua on November 3 to assist with national search and rescue operations. On
   November 2, USAID/OFDA provided $250,000 for the deployment of two U.S. DOD
   UH-60 helicopters and one CH-47 to assist with search and rescue efforts and delivery of
   relief supplies. An airlift of USAID/OFDA relief supplies, consisting of 279 rolls of plastic
   sheeting, 10,000 polyester blankets, 2,000 wool blankets, three 10,000-gallon water
   bladders, and 5,000 five-gallon water jugs, at a total estimated cost of $261,662 including
   transport, arrived in Managua on November 4.

   Belize: The Government of Belize established an Emergency Operations Center in Belize
   City to prepare for the storm's arrival and evacuated over 75,000 people from Belize City
   and the coastal islands to temporary shelters in Belmopan. Despite initial concerns, the
   hurricane did not directly strike Belize. Nonetheless, heavy rains caused flooding throughout
   the coastal areas, particularly in Belize City. The Government of Belize has since granted
   permission for residents to return to Belize City, however according to the Red Cross
   thousands have opted to remain in emergency shelters.

   On October 29, U.S. Charge d'Affaires Joel Danies declared a disaster for Belize due to the
   impacts of Hurricane Mitch. In response, USAID/OFDA immediately provided $25,000 for
   the local purchase of food for distribution to displaced populations inhabiting emergency
   shelters. In addition, USAID/OFDA provided funding for two U.S. DOD Blackhawk
   helicopters based in Honduras to conduct overflight assessments and evacuations. Weather
   conditions during the storm's peak never permitted these aircraft to fly and as Mitch veered
   away from Belize the helicopters were deployed to support emergency logistics
   requirements in Nicaragua. A four-person USAID/OFDA assessment team (comprised of a
   USAID/OFDA/LAC Regional Advisor and three Miami-Dade disaster specialists) was in
   Belize from October 29 to October 31. The team assessed current needs of the evacuated
   population and reported that food stocks were adequate in Belmopan, but in short supply in
   Belize City. The team also reported that sanitation and hygiene were poor in all
   flood-affected areas.

   Guatemala: The storm moved northwestward across Guatemala on November 1, causing
   heavy rains and severe flooding. The national emergency office (CONRED) took steps to
   evacuate 5,969 people prior to the storm's arrival while the Red Cross estimated that
   27,000 people were still housed in shelters. Officials report a total of 186 deaths and 91
   people are missing. OCHA reported yesterday that 150 homes, 8 bridges, and 21 roads
   have been severely damaged by flood waters.

   A USAID/OFDA/LAC consultant arrived in Guatemala on October 27 to assist CONRED
   and to provide regular updates to the USAID Mission and OFDA/LAC regional office in
   San Jose. On October 31, Ambassador Donald J. Planty declared a disaster for Guatemala.
   In response, USAID/OFDA provided $25,000 through the U.S. Embassy to Catholic Relief
   Services for the local purchase of food. USAID/OFDA deployed a Regional Advisor to
   Guatemala on November 1 to join the USAID/OFDA/LAC consultant in damage
   assessments and oversight of USAID/OFDA assistance. USAID/OFDA delivered 90 rolls
   of plastic sheeting, 3,000 polyester blankets, 2,350 five-gallon water jugs, and three
   3,000-gallon water bladders to Guatemala, at a total estimated cost of $70,172 including
   transport, on November 4.

   El Salvador: The National Emergency Committee (NEC) of El Salvador reports that 239
   people are dead and 135 missing as a result of flash floods. OCHA reports heavy
   infrastructural damage to bridges, roads, and electric and telephone lines in eastern and
   central El Salvador. Ambassador Anne W. Patterson declared a disaster in El Salvador on
   November 1. In response, USAID/OFDA provided $25,000 for the immediate needs of
   flood victims. In addition, USAID/OFDA will delivered 120 rolls of plastic sheeting, 5,150
   polyester blankets, 6,000 five-gallon water jugs, and four 3,000-gallon water bladders is
   scheduled to arrive today at a total estimated cost of $88,652 including transport. A
   Miami-Dade disaster specialist arrived in El Salvador on November 1 to assist a
   USAID/OFDA/LAC consultant in the coordination of relief operations. An OFDA/LAC
   disaster specialist arrived in El Salvador yesterday. The provision of additional
   USAID/OFDA assistance will be based upon the recommendations of the USAID/OFDA
   team.

   Costa Rica: Heavy rains along the entire Pacific coast of Costa Rica prompted the National
   Emergency Commission to evacuate at-risk populations. The Government of Costa Rica
   (GOCR) has since granted permission for people to return to their homes although
   approximately 1,700 people remain in temporary shelters. Four people are reported dead as
   a result of the storm while four are still missing.

   On October 23, the U.S. Charge d'Affaires to Costa Rica Richard L. Baltimore III declared
   a disaster due to severe flooding caused by Hurricane Mitch. USAID/OFDA responded by
   providing a total of $45,000 to the U.S. Embassy in San Jose. Funds are being used for the
   rental of local helicopters to assist with overflight assessments and the delivery of food,
   water, and medicine to affected populations. No additional USAID/OFDA assistance is
   anticipated. Three USAID/OFDA personnel, including an Information Specialist, deployed
   to San Jose to help coordinate the regional response.

   Mexico: The Mexican Government established plans to evacuate vulnerable coastal areas
   and the Mexican Red Cross pre-positioned a team of disaster response specialists in the
   Yucatan Peninsula in the event that the hurricane struck Mexico. USAID/OFDA/LAC
   maintains constant communication with USG and Mexican disaster officials, who are
   monitoring the effects of continued rainfall. USAID/OFDA remains prepared to respond to
   requests for assistance in Mexico, as appropriate.

   Region: USAID/OFDA has provided $500,000 to support the Pan American Health
   Organization (PAHO) conduct assessments and rehabilitation projects for the region's water
   and sanitation systems, and to engage in emergency health-related programming.
   USAID/OFDA has also utilized $60,000 to support the deployment of emergency supplies
   and personnel.

   USAID/OFDA will continue to closely monitor the situation throughout the Caribbean and
   Central America, maintaining a high level of preparedness and ability to quickly respond to
   changing needs and situations.
 

         USAID/OFDA Assistance in Honduras
                                                         $2,326,650
         USAID/OFDA Assistance in Nicaragua
                                                          $586,662
         USAID/OFDA Assistance in Belize
                                                           $25,000
         USAID/OFDA Assistance in Guatemala
                                                           $95,172
         USAID/OFDA Assistance in El Salvador
                                                          $113,652
         USAID/OFDA Assistance in Costa Rica
                                                           $45,000
         *USAID/OFDA Assistance to the Region
                                                          $560,000
         Total USAID/OFDA Assistance for Hurricane Mitch (to date)
                                                         $3,752,136
 

   * Region-wide assistance was used for the transportation of USAID/OFDA-deployed
   personnel.

   PUBLIC DONATION INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF HURRICANE
   MITCH

   Disasters often generate an outpouring of interest and concern by the American people
   which lead to spontaneous collections of relief supplies, i.e. food, clothing, medical supplies
   etc. In the interest of effective coordination of such public response we encourage
   concerned citizens to provide monetary donations to appropriate organizations.

   As transportation of relief supplies is limited by capacity, infrastructure damage and
   continuing weather constraints, it is difficult to move supplies into the affected countries.
   Unsolicited commodity donations often place an unnecessary burden on relief workers and
   local governments to store, transport and distribute supplies to those affected populations in
   need. This can also detract from the provision of more urgently needed relief assistance.
   USAID/OFDA can not provide assistance for the transport of donated goods.
 #Top of this Page
 

Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch Nicaragua, Guatemala And Honduras Ocha Situation Report No. 11
6 November 1998

General

1. Weather conditions in most countries making more detailed assessments possible. As a result, it
becomes evident that the dimension of devastations wrought on the entire region is far greater than
feared only a few days ago. The Central American commercial corridor which depends to 90
percent on road transport, has broken down, bringing intra-regional exchanges to a halt. Crop
losses in Nicaragua and Honduras for ex. also affect countries like El Salvador, for which both
have been sources of grain supply when its own production has been insufficient.

2. The overall problem is communication, in particular road transport. Food shortages, lack of
drinking water and electricity add to the deteriorating health situation of the hundred of thousands
evacuees in temporary shelters. Respiratory illnesses, diarrhoea and conjunctivitis are reported by
public health authorities from all affected countries.

3. The impact of 'Mitch' on Central American economies is yet to be fully analysed. Preliminary
estimates of damages to key sectors such as agriculture, road networks and supply systems
indicate that years of economic growth might have been wiped out with the inevitable
consequences on the living standards of the affected nations.

Nicaragua

4. Country is among those where assessments indicate much greater destruction than assumed
earlier. 80 percent of important coffee crop lost. Outbreak of volcano Cerro Negro exacerbating
existing difficulties to assist hurricane victims and relief operations. According to NEC death toll
now 1.652 and 2,000 missing. Total number of affected 750,000. No information yet on the fate of
40,000 people in Rio Coco, border area with Honduras.

5. Government services working on overall response strategies, based on individual plans for
distribution of relief items, estimates of food reserves, credit policies and price policies.

Guatemala

6. Latest report from UNDAC in-country team puts death toll at 194. Total of 78,000 people
evacuated and figure of population at risk now: 900,000. Heavy increase of damage on homes:
over 1,000 units destroyed, 890 moderately damaged.

7. 'Mitch', having regained strength over Mexican State of Yucatan, feared to cause fresh river
flooding and land slides in Guatemalan Department of El Peten, Huehuetenango, El Quiché and
Alta Verapaz. Rains over Pacific coast have decreased, central area expected to clear up, whereas
northwest receiving heavy rains.

8. Communication and road transport conditions have deteriorated. 75 land slides reported.
Access to the Capital is still difficult, and government has restricted movements and transit of
people to avoid unnecessary risks. Authorities hope to restore road network within 8 days with the
exception of the route to the Atlantic coast. The municipalities of Gualan, Puerto San José,
Chiquimulilla and Taxisco remain without telephone service, until weather allows deployment of
repair crews.

9. National response: the President personally involved on daily basis in coordination of relief
efforts by various ministries and services. UN agencies and national emergency services have
established joint reporting system on assessments and requirements.

Honduras

10. Latest reports confirm Honduras having had to bear the brunt of 'Mitch'. Death toll: 6,420, and
6,000 missing. Some 800,000 people evacuated. Up to now only 20 percent of telephone system
in operation.
 #Top of this Page

President Orders Aid to Hurricane Mitch Victims in Central America

          Washington, November 6, 1998 -- President Clinton has ordered $30
          million in equipment and services from the Department of Defense and
          $36 million in food fuel and other relief be supplied to Honduras,
          Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala following the devastation of
          Hurricane Mitch. The head of the US Agency for International
          Development indicated that $20 million in emergency food aid will be
          sent to the region from New Orleans beginning Saturday. Some victims
          in Honduras have been without food for five or six days and the risk of
          disease and other major problems increases with each passing day.

          The U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Office of
          Foreign Disaster Assistance is coordinating U.S. disaster relief efforts for
          the Central American countries hit by Hurricane Mitch.

 #Top of this Page

World Bank Press Release On Aid To Honduras
THE WORLD BANK
Latin America and Caribbean Region
 

WORLD BANK RESPONDS TO PLEA FOR INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR HONDURAS

WASHINGTON, November 5, 1998 -- The World Bank today announced a
series of immediate actions to support emergency disaster relief
efforts in Honduras.

To assess the damage, the local World Bank office in Honduras has
mobilized a special team of experienced staff, including specialists
in disaster management, transportation, relief work, agriculture, and
water supply, to address the most urgent needs facing Honduras.

Following this assessment, the World Bank is immediately making
available funds from a recently approved U.S.$45 million loan for the
Social Investment Fund Project (known as FHIS IV) to meet communities'
needs for emergency rehabilitation of basic infrastructure services in
rural areas affected by the floods.

In addition, plans are underway to advance a scheduled disbursement of
about U.S.$20 million from the Public Sector Adjustment Project to
support the government's immediate need for financial support to help
cope with the disaster. The World Bank is also working with the
Government of Honduras to redirect funds under all other operations in
their country as needed.

The World Bank is focussing its assistance on helping the government
with overall disaster recovery efforts, including repairing roads and
bridges and addressing health concerns and other urgent problems in
the rural areas.

"The World Bank team has been extraordinarily impressed by the
dedication and tireless energy of Government officials and the
outstanding efforts of so many private sector groups and
non-governmental organizations. Under very difficult circumstances,
emergency teams mobilized by different government agencies are working
around the clock to identify problem areas and provide assistance,"
says Donna Dowsett-Coirolo, Country Director for Central America.
 

O.A.S. Calls Inter-American Agencies Together To Coordinate  Emergency Aid For Central America

The Organization of American States (OAS) today called on
inter-American agencies to join effort to establish the mechanisms
needed to coordinate emergency aid for Central American countries hit
by Hurricane Mitch last weekend.

The OAS Permanent Council also passed a set of measures to marshal
international aid for the affected nations. This, after conveying
condolence and solidarity to the governments and peoples of Honduras,
Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador and Belize where the hurricane took
a severe human and material toll. Involved in the effort are the
Inter-American Emergency Aid Fund (FONDEM), Pan American Development
Fund (PADF), Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture,
Inter-American Development Bank, and the White Helmets, among others.

At the meeting the Honduran ambassador, Laura Nunez Flores, gave an
update on the extent of the tragedy in her country, calling it
"incalculable and beyond description." She said as it stood, an
estimated 7,000 had died with over 2 million left homeless. "Honduras
suffered a mortal wound, not a death blow," she declared. "We will get
back on our feet, with the help of God and friends and friendly
organizations and governments, and through hard work by all
Hondurans."

Nicaragua's ambassador, Felipe Rodriguez, called the trail left by the
hurricane "truly catastrophic." According to the latest reports, more
than 2,000 people had died and damage was over half a million dollars.

Updates were also provided on Belize, El Salvador and Guatemala by the
respective ambassadors who also appealed for urgent international aid.

One of the resolutions passed by the Permanent Council called on the
secretary general to take the necessary steps to provide the Central
American countries with technical and financial aid, and in particular
to explore the possible resources from other international agencies,
including White Helmets assistance.

A second resolution covering coordination of OAS aid for victims of
the hurricane, asks the secretary general to convene a meeting of
FONDEM within 48 hours to devise mechanisms that will be needed to
coordinate humanitarian aid. The secretary general is also being asked
to pursue efforts with PADF to promote and collect donations and goods
from individuals and public and private as well as non-governmental
organizations for distribution in the humanitarian aid drive.

The member countries also decided to call a Permanent Council meeting
to review what mechanisms could be made available by the
inter-American system to respond to natural disasters and to see what
measures could be adopted to strengthen coordination.

All OAS member country delegations took the floor in this morning's
session to convey their condolences at the immensity of the tragedy.
They also reported on steps their respective governments were taking
to deliver humanitarian assistance as soon as possible.
 

Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch El Salvador, Guatemala And Nicaragua, Ocha Situation Report No. 10, 5 November 1998
 

Ref: OCHAGVA - 98/0340

CENTRAL AMERICA - HURRICANE/TROPICAL STORM MITCH
EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA AND NICARAGUA
OCHA SITUATION REPORT NO. 10
5 NOVEMBER 1998

General

1. Rescue operations and immediate relief assistance continuing despite heavy rains and winds.
Overall dimension, i.e., of losses of lives, devastations and damages caused by the hurricane in the
five countries not yet fully assessed. Current estimates indicate 2.5 million people affected.

2. Following his meeting with Ambassadors from Central American Countries, the United Nations
Secretary-General has sent a letter to the Presidents of the World Bank, the International
Monetary Fund and the Inter-American Development Bank drawing their attention to the
medium-term reconstruction needs of the affected countries in which these institutions could play a
vital role. He has requested the OCHA-Emergency Relief Coordinator and the Administrator of
UNDP to support them.

3. WFP has announced a considerable increase in the delivery of food to victims in the affected
countries. A team from Rome is on its way to Nicaragua and Honduras to assess logistics and
organisational aspects. Currently WFP is feeding some 250,000 vulnerable people, women,
children and elderly, in both countries drawing from its stocks in the region.
4. WHO has launched an appeal for 10 million dollars for repairs of health facilities, basic
medicines, water containers and chlorine. Staff from WHO's Regional Office together with national
officials have recommended the urgent implementation of five activities: an early epidemic warning
/response system, vector control, sanitation measures and local purchases of medical supplies. The
Regional Office has also assumed the responsibility for the coordination of response and mitigation
for the health sector.

5. IFRC has appealed for 12.5 million Swiss francs, about 8 million dollars, to assist 180,000
victims in affected countries for the coming three months. Funds will be used for provision of food,
tents, medicines, kitchen utensils and drinking water. Staff from National Societies have been in the
forefront of rescues operations. More than 8,000 Red Cross volunteers are currently working in
the region.

El Salvador

6. Death toll: 239. 135 people missing and a total of 57,777 affected. Medical assistance has been
given to 35,980 people in the 11 temporary shelters in the country.

7. Infrastructure: 17 bridges damaged, 3 collapsed. 10,000 houses destroyed and 830 schools
damaged. Impact on the agricultural sector still being evaluated.

8. Parliament has declared entire territory a disaster zone. In a nation-wide broadcast, the
President has announced preparations for reconstructing the country on the basis of detailed
assessments by teams from the government services concerned.

Nicaragua

9. OCHA-UNDAC team began work with UNDP and National Emergency Committee (NEC).
Team indicates severe difficulties for all road transport, since 2.500 km paved/unpaved roads
damaged to various degrees. Strong need for strengthening airlift capacity for both surveys and
transport of goods. Currently 11 helicopters in operation, of which 4 from the United State. First
full report from the team expected tomorrow.

10. UNDP assisting NEC and Civil Defense in organising teams of national and international
experts to assess the situation in most affected areas such as Ocotal and Wiwili. UNDP and UN
agencies are developing project profiles for immediate implementation, including debris clearing and
rehabilitation of sewage system.

11. Quantification and priorities are being prepared by NEC in collaboration with Civil Defense.
Most urgent needs appear to be in isolated areas where assessments have been hampered by
weather conditions and lack of means.

Guatemala

12. In-country UNDAC team reports: 157 dead, 45,920 evacuated, about 16,500 people
isolated. Total number at risk 875, 738. 354 houses either destroyed or damaged. 30 roads
blocked and 21 bridges destroyed.

13. Rains have decreased, except over Pacific coastal areas. Fuel distribution has been restored in
Guatemala City. All ports and international airports open. Major problem remains road transport.

14. UNDAC team planning assessment missions with government services on 5/6 November,
weather permitting, to seriously affected areas in the northeast and the southwest. Assessments in
the education, health and agriculture sectors underway and results expected shortly.

15. Food distribution to affected areas has been carried out by the Executive Secretariat of the
Presidency, the National Investment Fund and the National Peace Fund.

Requirements

16. The Ministry of Health with assistance from PAHO, UNICEF,UNFPA and other agencies has
identified needs for basic sanitation.

17. In this context, donors are reminded that donations in the area of health should be cleared with
PAHO/Washington: phone +1 202 974 35 20, fax +1 202 775 45 78.
 

--------------------------
 

18. Contributions: Please see attached list:

19. OCHA is prepared to serve as a channel for cash contributions for the immediate relief needs
detailed above. Funds channelled through OCHA will be spent in coordination with the relevant
organizations of the UN system and OCHA will provide written confirmation of their use. Funds
should be transferred to OCHA account No. CO-590.160.1 at the UBS AG, PO Box 2770,
CH-1211 Geneva 2, with reference: OCHA - Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch.
 
 

Central America - Tropical Storm Mitch, Honduras, Nicaragua OCHA Situation
      Report No. 6
      Ref. OCHAGVA - 98/0336

      CENTRAL AMERICA - HURRICANE/TROPICAL STORM MITCH
      HONDURAS, NICARAGUA
      OCHA-GENEVA SITUATION REPORT NO. 6
      31 OCTOBER 1998

      Data on the emergency situation in Central America related to hurricane/tropical
      storm Mitch is continuously being up-dated as assessments are carried out. Below
      follows a summary of data
      reported so far to OCHA regarding Honduras and Nicaragua.

      Honduras

      1. Heavy rainfall continues to impact a major part of the country. Flooding is very
      severe, landslides are still occurring and flood waters are rising. About 75 per cent
      of agricultural and industrial zones are affected by flooding.

      2. In the present emergency situation, it is impossible to give any reliable preliminary
      figures for the number of people affected. The number of deaths is uncertain and it is
      reported that 250,000 have
      fled their homes.

      3. Most bridges between Tegucigalpa and its twin city Comayaguela have been
      destroyed leaving the capital divided into two parts. Mudslides have cut off the
      highway between the capital and San Pedro Sula (second largest city). Many towns
      have been cut off due to damage to bridges and roads.

      4. The United Nations Resident Coordinator and the United Nations Disaster
      Management Team are working very closely with the Government and its Permanent
      Commission of Contingency (COPECO).

      5. Emergency requirements fall into the categories of food, medicines, blankets,
      systems for drinking water and sanitation.

      Urgent requirement: rescue boats with crews and availability of an additional 40
      helicopters (source: Head of COPECO).

      Nicaragua

      6. The intense precipitation has affected the entire country (overflowing of rivers,
      landslides) but in particular the departments of Chinandega, Esteli, Leon and
      Matagalpa and the areas of the
      Nicaragua Lake down to the border with Costa Rica.

      7. Some 180,000 people are without basic provisions (food, blankets, plastic
      sheeting clothing, medicines). 121 dead and some thousands non-accounted for.
      172 communities isolated. 5,066 houses affected (1,010 destroyed and 4,056
      damaged).

      8. Serious damage caused to the road network. Transport is a major problem owing
      to the inaccessibility of the disaster-affected areas. Bad weather conditions make
      even transport by air very difficult, at times impossible.

      9. Breakdown in the systems supplying drinking water and electricity.

      10. Preliminary estimates of material losses represent more than USD 30 million. No
      estimates have yet been made of losses of harvest but damage to the network of
      roads and bridges are hampering transport of agricultural products to market places.
 

      11. National relief efforts are a joint effort of the Civil Defence System and the
      Army. The United Nations Disaster Management Team has set up an emergency
      committee including all the specialized UN agencies with WFP as lead agency.
      Through the Resident Coordinator, this committe is working closely with the national
      authorities.

      12. Emergency requirements fall into categories of food, blankets and medicines.
      The Ministry of Health has warned that their regular stocks of medicines are running
      out.

      13. A joint mission of WFP and WHO/PAHO will carry out damage assessment to
      evaluate requirements for rehabilitation.

      14. Contributions US Dollars

      United Nations System

      WFP Emergency food assistance 150,000 (from in-country stocks) for 50,000
      people during two weeks

      Appeals from the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent
      Societies (IFRC) and from WHO/PAHO

      15. IFRC has launched an preliminary appeal to the amount of CHF 3.2 million
      (approx. USD 2.4 million) to assist 90,000 beneficiaries in Central America and
      Mexico.

      16. WHO/PAHO has launched an appeal for USD 467,000 (for mainly Honduras
      but also for Nicaragua and Belize) covering emergency repairs to health
      infrastructure, support to epidemiological surveillance and control system, support to
      supply management inventory, public
      health supplies and equipment, purchase and transport of insecticides, purchase and
      transport of water containers and chlorine and priority repairs to the El
      Progresso/Honduras water system.
      Donors wishing to contribute to this appeal should address themselves to
      PAHO/Washington: phone +1 202 974 35 20, fax +1 202 775 45 78.

      17. OCHA is prepared to serve as a channel for cash contributions for the
      immediate relief needs detailed above. Funds channelled through OCHA will be
      spent in coordination with the relevant organizations of the UN system and OCHA
      will provide written confirmation of their use. Funds should be transferred to OCHA
      account No. CO-590.160.1 at the UBS AG, PO Box 2770, CH-1211 Geneva 2,
      with reference: OCHA - Central America - Hurricane/Tropical Storm Mitch.

 #Top of this Page

President Clinton
.Our prayers here at the White House....
 

...........Our prayers here at the White House go out to the citizens
of Honduras,
Nicaragua, Mexico, El Salvador and Guatemala, who have suffered so
much as a result of Hurricane Mitch, and are trying to put their
lives back together. The United States is determined to help. We
have provided over $2 million in funding for food, medicine, water

and other supplies. Two airlifts already have arrived with sheeting
for shelter and food. Another airlift will take off today.

In addition, foreign disaster assistance teams have been
deployed to all the affected countries to coordinate our aid relief
efforts, and we'll be looking at what else we can do. This is a
terrible tragedy for the people of Central America and we will do
what we can to help them to recover.

TEXT: U.S. SENDS DISASTER RELIEF TO CENTRAL AMERICA

(Hurricane Mitch continues to hamper aid efforts)  (1650)

WASHINGTON -- The United States is providing $3.5 million in disaster
assistance to Central American countries affected by Hurricane Mitch.
The bulk of the aid -- about $2.3 million -- is slated for Honduras,
which has suffered the brunt of the storm, the U.S. Agency for
International Development (USAID) announced November 2.

Following is the text of a USAID fact sheet outlining U.S. relief
efforts in Honduras, Nicaragua, Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala and
Mexico, as well as an update on conditions in each of those countries:

 #Top of this Page
 

U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

DISASTER RESPONSE UPDATE
Hurricane Mitch
November 2, 1998
 

U.S. Agency For International Development Provides $3.5 Million In
Response To Hurricane Mitch; Activates Disaster Assistance And
Response Team
(DART)

Today, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID)
Administrator J. Brian Atwood, announced $3.5 million in disaster
assistance to provide relief in Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, and
the southeastern portion of Mexico to alleviate suffering caused by
Hurricane Mitch. Atwood also deployed a full-scale Disaster Assistance
and Response Team (DART) to manage and coordinate the U.S. Government
relief effort in Central America. Senior Regional Disaster Advisor
Paul Bell, the DART team leader, is based in the U.S. Embassy in San
Jose, Costa Rica.

Heavy rains and high winds continue to affect Honduras, Guatemala, El
Salvador, and the southeastern portion of Mexico. Adverse weather
conditions are hampering damage assessment capabilities and delivery
of relief supplies to affected countries. In addition to assistance
provided for specific countries, USAID has provided $510,000 in
regional assistance including a water and sanitation assessment by the
Pan-American Health Organization.

Honduras: USAID has provided a total of $2,326,650 in assistance to
Honduras. This assistance includes: $1,325,000 to the USAID Mission in
Honduras and private voluntary organizations for the local purchase
and transport of critical relief supplies, including food, simple
cooking stoves, blankets, and medical supplies; $750,000 for the
deployment of U.S. aircraft to assist in overflight assessments,
search and rescue operations, and delivery of relief supplies;
$251,650 for transport and supply of 460 rolls of plastic sheeting,
twenty 10,000 collapsible water tanks, and 10,000 five-gallon water
jugs. Seven USAID disaster specialists have been deployed to Honduras
to assist in the response to this disaster. The team began arriving in
Honduras on October 27.

The first airlift carrying USAID relief supplies arrived at La Ceiba
on October 31 and the second arrived at Soto Cano on November 1. A
third airlift will deliver the remainder of USAID relief supplies to
Soto Cano on November 2. In-country missions by USAID funded aircraft
have been hampered to date by poor visibility.

Honduras continues to suffer the brunt of the storm. After being
stalled for more than 48 hours off the country's northern coast, the
storm traveled inland over Honduras on October 30 and 31. Extensive
flooding and wind damage is being reported on the northern coast and
in the Bay Islands. The National Emergency Commission (COPECO)
confirms 254 deaths as a result of the storm. According to COPECO and
the Ministry of Health, as of October 30, over 120,000 people had been
evacuated from affected areas to temporary shelters. Honduran
officials report that at least 15,000 houses have been destroyed along
the Atlantic coast and that as many as 100 bridges have been damaged
or destroyed. Assessments conducted by COPECO indicate that the Bay
Islands of Guanaja, Roatan, and Utila and the areas of La Ceiba,
Tocoa, and Trujillo are the most severely affected. La Ceiba is
flooded and essentially cut off, with both the Danto and Cangrejal
rivers overflowing their banks. San Pedro Sula, the second largest
city in Honduras, is one meter under water.

Nicaragua: USAID has provided $360,000 in disaster assistance to
Nicaragua. This assistance includes: $25,000 for the local purchase of
critical relief supplies, including medicines and food; $250,000 for
two U.S. Blackhawk helicopters and one Chinook to assist with search
and rescue efforts and delivery of relief supplies; and $85,000 for an
airlift of USAID relief supplies, consisting of 200 rolls of plastic
sheeting, 4,000 blankets, ten 10,000 collapsible water tanks, and
5,000 five-gallon water jugs to arrive in Managua on November 3. USAID
deployed a Regional Advisor to Nicaragua on October 31 to assist with
assessment and response activities. A USAID funded Miami-Dade disaster
specialist will arrive in Nicaragua on November 2 to assist with
national-level search and rescue operations.

Heavy rains resulting from Mitch continue to cause serious flooding
throughout Nicaragua. Rivers in the northern Atlantic coastal areas
and in Esteli, Jinotega, Matagalpa, and Chinandega have overflowed
their banks, causing serious mudslides. A single mudslide in the
northwestern province of Chinandega has increased the Nicaraguan death
toll to 1,212 and left over 2,000 people missing from ten communities
situated at the base of the Casitas Volcano. The U.S. Embassy in
Managua reports that 415,000 people are displaced nationwide. Damage
to roads and bridges and to the agricultural sector are significant.
The Pan American Health Organization reports that damage to the
transportation network equals approximately $16 million. Figures of
damage to the agricultural sector have not yet been released.

Belize: USAID has provided $25,000 in assistance to Belize for the
local purchase of food to be distributed to affected populations in
shelters. A four-person USAID assessment team arrived in Belize on
October 29 and departed on October 31. The team assessed current needs
of the evacuated population and reported that food stocks were
adequate in Belmopan, but in short supply in Belize City. The team
also reported that sanitation and hygiene were poor in all
flood-affected areas.

The Government of Belize established an Emergency Operations Center in
Belize City to prepare for the storm's arrival and evacuated over
75,000 people from Belize City and the coastal islands to temporary
shelters in Belmopan. Despite initial concerns, the hurricane did not
directly strike Belize. Nonetheless, heavy rains caused flooding
throughout the coastal areas -- particularly in Belize City. The
Government of Belize has granted permission for residents to return to
Belize City, however many families continue to remain in Belmopan.

Guatemala: USAID has provided $64,172 in assistance to Guatemala
including: $25,000 for the local purchase of food and $39,172 for the
airlift of USAID supplies -- 90 rolls of plastic sheeting, 3,000
blankets, 2,350 five-gallon water jugs, and three 3,000-gallon
collapsible water tanks which will arrive on November 4.

A USAID consultant arrived in Guatemala on October 27 and was joined
by a USAID Regional Advisor Regional Advisor on November 1.

The storm moved northwestward across Guatemala on November 1 causing
heavy rains and precipitating flooding. Rivers in the Atlantic and
central regions of Guatemala continue to rise. Between 12,000 to
14,000 people are currently seeking safety in shelters. An unconfirmed
number of homes, bridges, and roads have been damaged by flood waters.
Officials verify a total of 31 deaths. The national emergency office
(CONRED) took steps to evacuate 5,969 people prior to the storm's
arrival.

El Salvador: USAID has provided $82,152 in disaster assistance for El
Salvador including: $25,000 for the local purchase of relief supplies
and $57,152 for USAID supplies of 117 rolls of plastic sheeting, 5,150
blankets, 6,000 five-gallon water jugs, and four 3,000-gallon
collapsible water tanks on November 4. A Miami-Dade disaster
specialist arrived in El Salvador on November 1 to assist in the
coordination of relief operations.

Preliminary reports indicate that 144 people are dead as a result of
flash floods in El Salvador.

Costa Rica: USAID has provided $45,000 in disaster assistance for
Costa Rica. This assistance has been used for the local purchase of
relief supplies and rental of local helicopters for assessments and
delivery of food, water, and medicine to affected populations.

Heavy rains along the entire Pacific coast of Costa Rica prompted the
National Emergency Commission to evacuate at risk populations. The
Government of Costa Rica recently granted permission for people to
return to their homes. According to government officials,
approximately 4,000 people are homeless and seven people are dead as a
result of the storm.

Mexico: The Mexican Government established plans to evacuate
vulnerable coastal areas and the Mexican Red Cross pre-positioned a
team of disaster response specialists in the Yucatan Peninsula in the
event that the hurricane struck Mexico. USAID maintains constant
communication with U.S. government and Mexican disaster officials, who
are monitoring the effects of continued rainfall.

Background: Hurricane Mitch began as a tropical depression more than
ten days ago. It quickly developed into one of the strongest
hurricanes to hit the Caribbean, dumping heavy rains all along the
Central American coastline. The hurricane was downgraded to a tropical
storm on October 30 and to a tropical depression on October 31. At its
height on October 26 and 27, the hurricane had sustained winds of 180
mph. As of early evening on November 1, the storm was located near
Tapachula, Guatemala on Mexico's southern Pacific coast (near the
border with Guatemala). At that time, the storm was traveling at 8 mph
in a west-northwesterly direction. Maximum sustained winds had
dissipated to 30 mph.

USAID's Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance in Washington, D.C.,
coordinates all U.S. government relief operations worldwide. USAID
will continue to closely monitor the situation throughout the
Caribbean, maintaining a high level of preparedness and ability to
quickly respond to changing needs and situations.

 #Top of this Page

Florida Reports
SITUATION REPORT #3 STATE OF FLORIDA
Tropical Storm Mitch Does a Hit and Run Over Florida
 

Tropical Storm Mitch Does a Hit and Run Over Florida

Washington, November 6, 1998 -- Tropical Storm Mitch hit southern
Florida and continued out into the Atlantic Ocean Thursday afternoon
leaving one dead, tornado damage in Monroe County and minor flood
damage in other parts of the state. As of 5 a.m. this morning, the system
formerly known as Mitch was located several hundred miles off the
coast of Massachusetts heading rapidly to the northeast. After its long
and deadly journey, the system has lost all of its tropical characteristics
and is no longer a threat to U.S. territory, according to the National
Hurricane Center.

FEMA and State officials will complete a joint Preliminary Damage
Assessment in Monroe County today. Initial figures for Monroe County
indicate 28 homes were destroyed, 37 sustained major damage and 133
others sustained minor damage. A total of 346 homes were otherwise
affected. It is also estimated that the county sustained around $1.8
million in debris removal costs and damage to public building and
schools.

About 19 homes sustained damage in Palm Beach County, preliminary
reports indicate, and minor flooding was reported in the Delray,
Lantana, Boca Raton, Boyton Beach and Lake Worth areas. In Martin
County, numerous roads are impassable and assessments of the
roadways will be done after the water recedes.
 

SITUATION REPORT #3 STATE OF FLORIDA
   Department of Community Affairs/Division of Emergency Management

   TROPICAL STORM MITCH
November 5, 1998 - 1700 hours
 

SITUATION

As of 1600 hours, EST, the National Hurricane Center reports all Tropical Storm Warnings are discontinued. Also, Mitch has lost its tropical characteristics and become extratropical. The center of the extratropical storm was located near Latitude28.2 North and Longitude 76.9 West or about 100 miles north-northeast of Little Abaco Island in the Bahamas. The Storm is moving toward the east northeast near 32 mph with maximum sustained winds of 60 mph. The central pressure is measured at 992 mb. The Hurricane Center has issued its last public advisory for Mitch!

COUNTY ACTIONS

Area 3

Flagler County - Reports that beach erosion is occurring in the Marineland area near the Jt. Johns/Flagler Co. line. Waves were eroding some of the sand dunes, but there is no threat to any structures or roads. Also there is minor beach erosion occurring in the Flagler Beach area.

Area 6

Hardee County- Reports that a State of Local Emergency was declared on
11/4/98.

Area 7

Monroe County: A preliminary survey for the Key Largo area (Lake Suprise Estates and Sexton Cove at approx. mile marker 106) was submitted by the county with the following results: 246 structures sustained minor damage; 87 major damage; 24 destroyed.

Palm Beach County: Reports that the EOC is at Level I activation. Preliminary reports from the county indicates that 19 homes sustained damage and flooding in the south county region including Delray, Lantana, Boca Raton, Boyton Beach and Lake Worth. One business also reported damage. Damage assessment is continuing.

Martin County - Reports that the EOC is at a Level I activation. Preliminary reports from the county indicates that 4 homes have received minor flooding with no significant damage. In the western part of the county, a number of roads are impassable and culverts have been washed out. There may also be some roads in the eastern part of the county with damage. Unable to do complete assessment of roadways until the water has receded.

STATE ACTIONS

The State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) will move to a Level 1 activation today at 1700 hours.

A Conference Call was held at 1600 hours to update the ESFs on current county and state actions. No additional calls are scheduled.

Emergency Support Functions

ESF 1 & 3: Transportation and Public Works - No update provided, please see previous report.

ESF 5: Information and Planning - Continues to generate situation and flash reports as the situation requires.

ESF 6: Mass - No update provided, please see previous report.

ESF 12: Energy - At 1600 hours, Florida Power and Light reports that approximately 40,000 customers remain without power system wide. Currently the breakdown is: Palm Beach County: 11,000; Broward 6000; Dade 20,000. However, power is expected to be restored by 2400 hours today. Collier and Lee counties should have all customers up by 1800 hours. Treasure Coast counties (Indian River, Okeechobee, St. Lucie and Martin) will have power restored by 2100 hours. Fl Keys Coop advises that all customers that could except power will be restored today.

Regional Response Teams/Personnel Deployment

Eric Gentry has been released from the National Hurricane Center as a member of the Hurricane Liaison Team.

Comfort Stations

The Salvation Army is working with local responders on identifying comfort station sites for Monroe County.

RECOVERY

An 8 member Federal/State Preliminary Disaster Assessment Team is presently in Monroe County performing an assessment. The team will proceed to Miami/Dade upon completing the Monroe assessment and then to other impacted areas as reports are received.

 #Top of this Page

Organizations accepting In-Kind Donations for Honduras

American Friends Service Committee
Philadelphia, PA
888-588-2372

Catholic Relief Services
Atlanta, GA
800-235-2772

Church World Services
Elkhart, IN
800-297-1516 x222

Church World Services Drop Off Sites: (box--weight limit 50 pounds)
Honduras:
Honduras Recovery                             ASOSAL
Reeves                                                 660 S. Bonnie Brae
1306 G Street, NW                                Los Angeles, CA  90057
Washington, DC 20005                         213/483-1224
202/628-6350

Nicaragua:
Cordoba Electronics                             Consulate General of Nicaragua
5120 Santa Monica                               8370 W. Flagier Street, Suite 220
Los Angeles, CA  90029                       Miami, FL  33166
213/669-1078

Direct Relief International--medical supplies only
Santa Barbara, CA  93117-3251
800-676-1638
 

Doctors Without Borders--medical supplies and medical staff only
New York, NY  10016
888-392-0392

International Aid, Inc.
Spring Lake, IL
800-968-7490

Luthern World Relief
New York, NY
800-597-5972

Mercy Corps International Hurricane Response Fund
Portland, OR
800-292-3355 x223

United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
New York, NY
800-554-8583

World Relief
Wheaton, IL
800-535-5433

World Relief Drop Off Site (box should be address as follows):
World Relief
Attn:  Steve Kabick, Bldg. 2143
6600 NW 18th Street
Miami International Airport Cargo Area
Miami, FL  33126
 
 

  Hurricane Mitch Page      The Disaster Center


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